Club Song

Celebrate each win with a hearty rendition of the
War Cry

Softly:
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zoomba
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zay
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zoomba
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zay
Hold `em down, you North-East warriors
Hold `em down, you Zulu chiefs, chiefs, chiefs, chiefs...


Start to build up:
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zoomba
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zay
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zoomba
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zay
Hold `em down, you Zulu warriors
Hold `em down, you Zulu chiefs, chiefs, chiefs

(Chief Shouts!): Chigamawa! (Tribals Shout!): Chiwa!
(Chief Shouts!): Chigamawa! (Tribals Shout!): Chiwa!


With great gusto:
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zoomba
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zay
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zoomba
Ay ziggy zoomba zoomba zay
Hold `em down, you Zulu warriors
Hold `em down, you Zulu chiefs, chiefs, chiefs, chiefs

(Chief Shouts!): Chigamawa! (Tribals Shout!): Chiwa!
(Chief Shouts!): Chigamawa! (Tribals Shout!): Chiwa!
(Chief Shouts!): Chigamawa! (Tribals Shout!): Chiwa!

Sing along with the Premier League Men as they kick off their Grand Final celebrations (Click here to view)

 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Zulu War Cry History

The North East Hockey Club was formed in 1994 as a result of the merger of the Campbelltown and the Tea Tree Gully Hockey Clubs.  The Campbelltown club brought the Zulu War Cry with them.

Milton Perryman introduced the song to the Campbelltown club in about 1965 to fire the players up before and after a game.  Milton was a member of the CMF and a Warrant Officer who was from the South African 8th Army taught the Regiment the Zulu song during a field firing camp.

A team from the Campbelltown club used to make trips to Mt Gambier at Easter each year to take part in a national hockey carnival which included sides from SA, VIC, NSW and Tasmania.  It was common practice for these sides to have a nickname.  After various attempts, the team eventually decided on “Zulus”.  Brian Blake made up shirts with “Zulus” on them and Milton Perryman became the original Zulu Chief.  Jim Harford inherited the job after Milton “retired”.

When North East was first formed the song was banned on the grounds that it might be a divisive element in what had been a very successful merger.  The song eventually resurfaced and is now an integral part of the club culture.

A big thanks to Life Member Andy Duncan for suppying us with this rich history